December 2001

Global civil society; Philanthropy and civil society in East Asia

Volume 6 , Number 4

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December 2001

Global civil society; Philanthropy and civil society in East Asia

Volume 6 , Number 4

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Guest Editors' Article

InterAction’s PVO Standards – set by and for NGOs

1 December 2001
Ken Giunta

InterAction’s 160 plus members receive over $3 billion in private contributions each year, plus over $1.5 billion in government funding. It is therefore vital that both the coalition and its individual members work to preserve the public trust. To this end, InterAction’s members developed PVO Standards in 1992.  To date, adherence to the Standards has been a matter for annual self-certification, but it seems that self-certification cannot always satisfy media and public scrutiny. InterAction’s Private …

 
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Editorial

Editorial – December 2001

How will the Central Asian republics, and above all Afghanistan, cope with the unprecedented amount of aid that will pour into the region once the shooting stops? How can we ensure that the mistakes of Bosnia and Kosovo are not repeated? What role can civil society play in creating peace and long-term stability in increasingly fragmented societies all over the world? How are US funders responding to the terrible events of 11 September? It is too soon to attempt to answer these questions, but the March issue of Alliance will try to address them. I want this special issue to …

Editorial – Global civil society: Philanthropy and civil society in East Asia

For the second time in the short space of 12 years, the world has witnessed an event that looks set to change national and institutional priorities. The first was highlighted by the fall of the Berlin Wall, the second by the fall of the twin towers of the World Trade Center. This catastrophe placed in sharp relief three important insights. It exploded the myth that Americans in their homeland are not vulnerable to the destructive acts of violence perpetrated by terrorists in other parts of the world. It expressed dramatically, to the chagrin of many Americans, the fact that they …